altNot all of us work in busy trauma centers. And even for those of us who do, it can sometimes be confusing to manage suspected vascular trauma of the extremities. In last month’s EM:RAP, Mel interviewed our favorite trauma surgeon, Dr. Kenji Inaba, who has a real knack for breaking things down in a clear, straightforward way.

altThis is the third installment in a series focusing on the common overdoses that cause bradycardia, hypotension and altered mental status. Over the past several months during interviews with toxicologist Dr. Sean Nordt, we have discussed calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, clonidine and digitalis glycosides. All four classes of drugs can be fatal in overdose and all of them appear on the list of single tablets that can kill a child.

altOver the past several months, we have featured a series of interviews with our resident toxicologist, Dr. Sean Nordt, on the common overdoses that cause bradycardia and hypotension: calcium channel blockers, beta blockers, clonidine and digoxin.  All of these drugs can be fatal in overdose and all of them appear on the list of single tablets that can kill a child.

altOverdoses that cause bradycardia and hypotension. Don't miss this month's EM:RAP video by Mel Herbert, MD discussing the article The Brady Bunch

altOverdoses that cause bradycardia and hypotension
Over the past several months, we have featured a series of interviews with our resident toxicologist, Dr. Sean Nordt, on the common overdoses that cause bradycardia and hypotension:

{source}
[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/19301060?title=0&byline=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0"]][[/iframe]][[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/19301060"]]Floaters and Flashes with Mel Herbert[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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altRecently on the EM:RAP podcast, we discussed the common presenting complaint of visual floaters and flashes. Our discussion was prompted by a recent piece in the JAMA Rational Clinical Examination series.(1) This is a great series of articles that examines the diagnostic utility of various clinical findings when considering important diagnoses in the setting of common presenting complaints.

altYou just sent someone home with peripheral vertigo . . . or was that a stroke? Before we break down an approach to vertigo, let’s briefly consider two questions: just how often does this “nightmare” scenario occur and does it really matter anyway?

altIn last month’s essay we discussed barotrauma, which occurs when gas in the body’s air-filled spaces shrinks with descent and expands with ascent. Perhaps the most common example of this is the diver that has trouble equalizing the pressure between their middle ear and the outside world due to a blocked or inflamed eustachian tube.

{source}
[[iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/15640184?title=0&byline=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0"]][[/iframe]][[p]][[a href="http://vimeo.com/15640184"]]Best of EM:RAP, Decompression Sickness[[/a]] from [[a href="http://vimeo.com/user1979050"]]Logan Plaster[[/a]] on [[a href="http://vimeo.com"]]Vimeo[[/a]].[[/p]]
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