altThe routine use of contrast (both oral and IV, and certainly rectal) is unnecessary for the majority of abdominal CT scans performed in the ED.  At least that is what the literature says over and over.

Merely utter the term “patient satisfaction” among most emergency physicians and you’ll quickly see us retreat into a world of skepticism and exasperation. The term has become symbolic of a never-ending battle over flawed data and an inaccurate evaluation of our performance.

In room six sat a typical 78-year-old nursing home patient with the history of a cough and low grade fever. She was pleasantly confused but followed instructions; grey and wrinkled but otherwise she looked better than most. Her vitals were normal. We found no fever at the time of triage and she had received no antipyretics.

altI occasionally enjoy intellectual jousting, especially with other airway enthusiasts, and its fun to prognosticate about the future of our practice. So let me give you my controversial take on the future of airway management. As I see it, the future of oxygenation in emergency airways is through the nose, not the mouth.

altAre Tasers a safe alternative to lethal force, or are they dangerous weapons associated with dysrhythmia and sudden cardiac death? Everything you need to know to treat the taser victim in the ED.

Burning belly pain awakens Marcus at 2 AM. Having it multiple times before, he’s tired of waking up and having to walk until it goes away.  ‘No more,’ he declares, ‘I’m going to the ER to get some relief.’

Mr. B presented to the ED acutely septic, likely secondary to an underlying pneumonia. He had advanced dementia and was functionally and cognitively declining at home. His recent life had been punctuated by trips back and forth to the hospital

In the name of high quality, cost-conscious care, ACEP has revised its stance on the Choosing Wisely campaign, voting to join the initiative in the fight against low value care.

altEmergency medicine education is an evolving art. As educators and learners, emergency physicians are quick to integrate new technologies into our educational armamentarium. It’s now the norm to glean pearls from podcasters while running on the treadmill, keep up with EM conference lectures via tweets, and use a variety of handheld apps to improve bedside care.

altDrug shortages are an all-too-common problem in the United States. Emergency physicians are more aware of the severity of the issue than most, as we use such a wide variety of medications. While the causes of drug shortages are multi-faceted, there is one contributing factor that’s been flying under the radar: “pay for delay.”

Popular Authors

  • Greg Henry
  • Rick Bukata
  • Mark Plaster
  • Kevin Klauer
  • Jesse Pines
  • David Newman
  • Rich Levitan
  • Ghazala Sharieff
  • Nicholas Genes
  • Jeannette Wolfe
  • William Sullivan
  • Michael Silverman

Earn CME Credit