Jeremy-Brown-90Dr. Jeremy Brown, director of the new Office of Emergency Care Research, works to improve emergency medicine’s seat at the NIH research table   

Some people I know are very diplomatic and couch their opinions with soft words like “may,” “perhaps” or “could” in order to allow some wiggle room. Not David Newman. His recent column in the Huffington Post pulled no punches: “The News About Tamiflu: It Doesn’t Work.1”

research-90This Fall, a cover of The Economist boldly asserted that scientific research is all but broken. Their main assertions – that negative findings go underreported, study replication is rare, and dubious findings go unchallenged – are significant and damning.

You might assume there are only so many ways to teach the coagulation cascade or the brachial plexus. But if you think today’s medical students are learning the way you did, you need schooling. Sitting in a crowded lecture hall to hear a professor and scribble notes, then heading home or to the library to memorize the material, will soon seem as archaic as overhead projectors.

In November the AMA House of Delegates held its interim meeting in Washington DC. While the spread of resolutions debated was vast and varied, the greatest focus of energy and emotion surrounded the repeal of the SGR. Of course we’ve been here before. Like Charlie Brown optimistically hoping that this time Lucy will hold the football steady, we keep landing on our backs as Congress applies a Band Aid and pushes the “doc fix” back another year.

Emergency Physicians Monthly has teamed up with the board prep pros at Rosh Review to bring you a mini board review, so that you can test yourself on a regular basis and track your progress. The following is the test – and answers – from the January edition of Emergency Physicians Monthly. Questions about the test? Talk back on Twitter @epmonthly

michelle-linAn 84-year old woman presents to your ED with a traumatic, left-sided posterior hip dislocation. You need to reduce the hip, but how should you sedate her? Procedural sedation is an important component of ED care. It allows us to more comfortably perform otherwise painful procedures such as fracture or dislocation reductions, endoscopies, large laceration repairs, and I&Ds. But how safe is procedural sedation in older adults?

Emergency Physicians Monthly has teamed up with the board prep pros at Rosh Review to bring you a mini board review, so that you can test yourself on a regular basis and track your progress. The following is the test – and answers – from the December edition of Emergency Physicians Monthly. Questions about the test? Talk back on Twitter @epmonthly

A few months before the Chilean Society of Emergency Medicine (SOCHIMU) sponsored the nation’s first course on emergency department management, emergency medicine – known as Urgencia – was recognized as Chile’s 38th medical specialty by the nation’s Comptroller General.

nare-90It’s a sunny Saturday afternoon and you are settling into your second cup of coffee when a young mother comes running into the emergency department clutching her 3-year-old son. She reports “I just took my eyes off of him for a second to answer the door. When I returned, he had a broken necklace on the floor, several small beads lying around him, and was crying.

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