Print
E-mail
Reprint

alt 

#13

ANSWER A.

The image depicts a patient with a kerion. This condition begins as Tinea capitis (scalp ringworm) that undergoes a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to the causative fungus. This inflammation causes the initial erythematous, scaly plaque of Tinea capitis to become boggy with inflamed, purulent nodules and plaques. The hair follicle is frequently destroyed by the inflammatory process in a kerion, leading to scarring alopecia. Treatment includes long-term systemic therapy, usually with oral griseofulvin and the addition of an antibiotic to treat any secondary bacterial infection. In addition, oral corticosteroids are administered to treat the severe inflammation.

Tinea capitis is a dermatophyte (B) infection most commonly caused by Trichophyton tonsurans that is transmitted from person to person via fomites, such as a barber’s razor. Treatment with topical agents (C) is inadequate and patients require systemic therapy. The initial infection of Tinea capitis is usually painless (D) with intense pruritus at times. However, with progressive inflammation and the development of a kerion, the lesion becomes painful.

Ref:
Hardin JM: Cutaneous Conditions, in Knoop KJ, Stack LB, Storrow AB, Thurman RJ (eds): The Atlas of Emergency Medicine, ed 3. New York, The McGraw-Hill Company, 2010, (Ch) 13:p 388-389.

Trovato MJ, Schwartz RA, Janniger CK. Tinea capitis: current concepts in clinical practice. Cutis. Feb 2006;77(2):93-9.

>>GO TO QUESTION 14

 

Comments   

# Mini Board Review: March 2013 EditionDiane Gilliland 2013-03-07 20:37
Thank you for putting together the questions for the mini board review. I find them very helpful!
Reply
# Mini Board reviewDr Zahn 2013-03-10 09:37
Good review....but alot of medical info, very specific...not known when you are out for years in practice.
Reply
# MDSam Morale 2013-03-11 17:06
Thanks for your effort. Nice to review uncommon diseases to keep us up to speed. It is amazing how many diseases, pathogens etc... have had their names changed : Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA) (formerly referred to as Wegener’s granulomatosis) .
Reply
# Robert Ditrolio 2013-03-12 17:10
Excellent review questions. Please keep them coming in future issues!
Reply

Add comment

Security code
Refresh

Popular Authors

  • Greg Henry
  • Rick Bukata
  • Mark Plaster
  • Kevin Klauer
  • Jesse Pines
  • David Newman
  • Rich Levitan
  • Ghazala Sharieff
  • Nicholas Genes
  • Jeannette Wolfe
  • William Sullivan
  • Michael Silverman

Earn CME Credit