WhiteCoat

Doctor Shopping

Did some searching about healthcare fraud and just read about a new law passed in Tennessee. According to this news station, it is now a felony to deceive a physician to get drugs. The last quote in this article shows how doctor shopping affects everyone:

“[Doctor shoppers] are taking up the time of our very important professionals who need to see patients who truly need their care.”

This needs to be a national law. Now.

Here are some more articles about the Tennessee law and about “doctor shoppers”:

http://www.bizjournals.com/memphis/stories/2007/07/23/daily22.html?surround=lfn
http://state.tn.us/finance/newsrel/doctor_shopping.html

http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/2001/501_drug.html

http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/180_05_010304/kam10498_fm.html

6 Responses to “Doctor Shopping”

  1. Future Doc says:

    Just found your blog. I really like your style and enjoy the funny stories from the ER. Keep on writing!

  2. Dr. WhiteCoat says:

    Thanks for the support. Was a little hesitant to start ranting online, but positive comments like yours make it worth it!

  3. PalMD says:

    In Michigan we have a state tracking system for narcotic prescriptions…in minutes i can pull up a record of every narc a patient has filled (at least under a particular name). It’s very handy to show to a patient. The state even occasionally sends out letters warning a doc of a patient’s suspicious behavior.

  4. […] different physicians to get multiple prescriptions for narcotics on tamper-resistant paper. Doctor shopping rears its ugly head again. Heck, I would even go to multiple pharmacies so I don’t raise the […]

  5. Beachdoc says:

    Great blog!

    Only problem with this is that you’d have to find someone willing to prosecute the jerk. “Give him a felony record for just getting some vicodin?” I can hear it now.

    Great idea though!

  6. Mark says:

    Man, this has been a law here in Kentucky for quite some time now, at least since 01. We have a prescription monitoring program, KASPER. It keeps track of all scheduled medication precriptions that are turned in at pharmcies, who turns them in, the physician and the pharmacy (and drug.) Every single time a person turns in a script, be it for OxyContin, or Valium, it goes into a computer database. I’ve read that a lot of people have been arrested this way, it’s a class D felony here which of course is no joke, it’s not like getting a speeding ticket!

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