WhiteCoat

Healthcare Update Satellite — 01-19-2014

Hospital administrators may be sabotaging their own satisfaction scores by boarding patients in the emergency department.
New study in Journal of Emergency Medicine shows that 6 out of 7 patients prefer inpatient boarding to boarding in the emergency department because inpatient hallways are deemed safer, more confidential, more comfortable, quieter, more private, and as having higher staff availability.

Interesting article in Medium about how physician inventors have created new products out of necessity – and why some products are more likely to go to market than others.

I have a funny feeling that this will be the most clicked-on article this week. Porn star’s health is reportedly in jeopardy from her O-cup breast implants. She can’t perform activities like getting dressed and alleges that the implants diminish her blood flow to her body and may cause blood clots. Doctors recommended double mastectomies, but the patient refuses, saying that it would ruin her career.

Usually we get those little baby roaches. This thing must have been huge. Australian man has inch-long cockroach pulled from his ear. When he first developed pain in his ear and figured out that it was a roach, he tried using a vacuum to get the critter out of there. When that didn’t work, he went to the emergency department and the doctors removed the roach with tweezers.
What should you do to keep cockroaches out of your ears? You can sleep with cotton in your ears or use earplugs. Once they’re in there, they usually can’t get out – either because of the wax in the ear or the tight fit of the ear canal (I’ve heard that roaches can’t crawl backwards, and with the angle of their legs, that makes sense, but I’ve never seen that confirmed by an entomologist). To get them out, first they have to be killed, then usually you have to use alligator forceps to grab them.

Midterm ads blasting Democrats by name for supporting Obamacare.
Vote them out. Then repeal the law just like they repealed prohibition.

Plaintiff allowed to proceed with her malpractice case against orthopedist who diagnosed her with lymphedema when patient develops a blood clot a year later and requires an amputation. Orthopedist recommended that she follow up with neurologist for numbness in her foot rather than a vascular specialist for her lymphedema.
The patient had symptoms for a year, didn’t seek further care, and it is the orthopedist’s fault?

University of Iowa fires employee for parking in the emergency department patient parking lot. The sign in the lot said that violators could be fined or towed. Administrative law judge rules that the firing was justified anyway – “she received a benefit intended for employer patients.”

California having lots of success enrolling patients in Obamacare … by enrolling patients in the emergency departments. Many of those patients are enrolled into Medicaid which will only strain the insurers and states even further.

Should doctors be Googling their patients? The article author, who is a physician, thinks not – it may cause the doctors to have inappropriate preconceived notions about patients. I think that if the information is available, the doctors should have the option to review it. It isn’t like patients don’t Google doctors and get misleading statistics from hack sites like Healthgrades.com.

Get your flu shot. Influenza is widespread throughout the US right now.

Don’t get your flu shot. It could cause you to develop narcolepsy.

Have chronic pelvic pain? The good news is that a doctor has developed a device that may cure it. The bad news is that men have to insert a hammer-shaped probe up their rectums in order for it to work.
Hat tip to Instapundit.

Exciting research by scientists at Cornell. By coating leukocytes with special proteins, they were able to form “unnatural killer cells” that would find and kill cancer cells floating in the circulation. You need an advanced degree to understand the paper, but if they can get the process to work reliably on humans, it will be a huge breakthrough for cancer treatment.

Abusing the system? Patient gets airlifted from Galapagos Islands by an Ecuadorian navy helicopter and then takes jet to US in order to receive treatment for a kidney stone.
If your name is Jeff Bezos and you’re paying the tab, you can get whatever treatment you want.

Australian emergency departments trying to cope with inappropriate emergency department use are considering charging patients a co-payment. Detractors argue that patients will avoid accessing care that they need if they have to pay for it.
They’ll probably avoid accessing care that they don’t need as well …

6 Responses to “Healthcare Update Satellite — 01-19-2014”

  1. mark says:

    re:cockroach in the ear. I think the spray anesthetic (for the patient) kills the insect due to the dosage, if it doesn’t kill, the insect runs out of the hole they found to hide in.

    • WhiteCoat says:

      I’ve never seen a cockroach crawl out of an ear. Regarding the way to kill the cockroach, I usually use 1% lidocaine dripped into the ear canal until full. Never thought about spray anesthetic into the ear, though. My only concern would be potentially rupturing the eardrum from the pressure of the spray.

      • mark says:

        I’ll see if I can find a reference.

      • mark says:

        I can’t find the reference yet.
        I found a video of a manual extraction. In the video they should have had an earplug on hand (to inser), to stop the (live) insect from going back in.
        I think it didn’t like the bright light.

  2. MS4 says:

    I cannot believe that you are seriously telling people to not get a flu vaccination.

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