WhiteCoat

Healthcare Update Satellite — 04-02-2014

See other medical news on my other blog at DrWhiteCoat.com

Liberal use of blood transfusions may increase the incidence of serious infections. I don’t have access to the entire article, but wonder if the study also looked at overall mortality. In other words, is the increased risk of developing a serious infection outweighed by preventing more deaths from severe anemia (lower oxygen carrying capacity, increased cardiac demand, etc)

Traumaman … Traumaman goes wherever a trauma can. Sprayable nanofibers may soon replace sutures and may revolutionize trauma care. I imagine it’s only a matter of time until the idea is weaponized. One splat in the face and you’re through.

I’m with Skeptical Scalpel and SurgeryWatch on this one. If patient satisfaction and doctor ratings are of such value to the medical industry, we really need to expand the concept to other industries as well. Enter Airline Pilot Ratings. One of you flyboys hits turbulence and you’re ratings are through. If my ticket price is too high, you’ll be lucky if I give you a single “fair” rating on your whole report card. And if there are any delays, I mean ANY delays … I’ll give you friggin negative numbers. You hear me? NEGATIVE! Oh, by the way, I don’t like how your voice is muffled when you talk on the speaker. You get points off for that, too.
Yep. That’s how all enterprise should work.
Next up: Patient ratings.

Can charm be taught? Meet this generation’s version of (a female) Dale Carnegie and decide. The article is long, but well-written and enjoyable, so grab a cup of coffee before clicking on the link.

Another hospital closes its doors. Hospital board votes to close North Adams Regional Hospital in Massachusetts with only three days’ notice. The hospital had previously been open for 129 years. Nearby Berkshire Medical Center is going to attempt to preserve services at the hospital, but a source for funding has yet to be identified.

Give me the girl. Judge gives permanent custody of a Connecticut girl who is hospitalized in a Massachusetts hospital to the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families. “Closed-door juvenile court hearings late last year” allegedly proved that the parents were unfit to handle their child’s complex needs. It probably didn’t help that the girls dad was being a tool, failing to work with healthcare providers, threatening the social worker assigned to the girl’s case, and calling hospital personnel “Nazis.”
But if these types of things are sufficient to take custody of a child away from the parents, then we’re a few virtual reality computer programs and a holodeck away from the real life Hunger Games.
Another story on this case in the Boston Globe.

Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology (the “other” ACEP) tries to get Wikipedia to open up its policies to encourage more articles about topics such as Emotional Freedom Techniques, Thought Field Therapy, and the Tapas Acupressure Technique. Wikipedia co-founder responds rather thoughtfully.
“If you can get your work published in respectable scientific journals—that is to say, if you can produce evidence through replicable scientific experiments, then Wikipedia will cover it appropriately. What we won’t do is pretend that the work of lunatic charlatans is the equivalent of “true scientific discourse.” It isn’t.”
Lunatic charlatans, eh? If advancing directives without having work published in reputable scientific journals and without those directives resulting form replicable scientific experiments is what defines the term, then the Joint Commission, Press Ganey, and most of the people who created Hospital Compare fit the definition.

Right on, brother. A leading neuroscientist asserts that ADHD is not a disease, it’s a label that is used to prescribe dangerous medications to children. The medications given to ADHD patients cause long-term changes in the brain and “their rewards systems change.”
Maybe that’s why some people call Ritalin and similar medications “kiddie cocaine.”

Another interesting article about the human microbiome. Certain bacteria in a woman’s vagina may protect against HIV infection. In the study, patients with bacterial vaginosis and taking an antiviral medication had significantly reduced antiviral activity while those patients with healthy vaginal bacteria and treated with the antiviral produced significantly less HIV.

High school teacher forced to resign after taking a 20 year old student (an adult capable of consenting to the actions) to the emergency department for an undisclosed problem and then paying for the cost of the student’s medical treatment.
Huh?

Bwaaaaaaah. District Court Judge Carter Schildknecht has open and closed door meetings with hospital administrators after her husband had a heart attack in the emergency department at Medical Arts Hospital. Ellis Schildknecht apparently had a gag order imposed by his wife as he remained silent during the meeting … and because of HIPAA laws, the hospital can’t respond publicly to the Judge’s complaint, leaving District Court Judge Schildknecht’s vague question “Is this the reputation that you want our hospital to have in this community?” out there for debate.
Saving the life of a patient suffering from a heart attack? Yes. That’s the reputation we want.
Perhaps you could order that your husbands files be released to the public so everyone could review the care that you deem so deficient and worthy of contempt.

3 Responses to “Healthcare Update Satellite — 04-02-2014”

  1. cape cod step mom says:

    The Boston Children’s & DCFS case is much more complicated than you imply. This case had been going on for over a year and at its base seems to be one set of doctors disagreeing with the treating doctors at Tufts. I’m sure the dad was being a tool but MA DCFS has kept his daughter for over a year. Of course there may be something big that we don’t know.

  2. Matt says:

    “Closed-door juvenile court hearings late last year”

    – No need to put that in quotes, it’s nothing nefarious. All juvenile cases are closed to the public, so any news you’re going to get about the case is going to come from the parents, who obviously have an agenda.

    It’s pretty hard to take a kid from the parents, and I’ve seen some terrible terrible parents get chance after chance. Even these people still have an opportunity to get their act together and get their kid back.

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