WhiteCoat

Healthcare Update Satellite 04-24-2014

Kudos to staff at Blessing Hospital in Quincy, IL for its excellent management of a rollover bus accident with 27 kids. You all do us proud!

Stock up on your Norco pills now, folks. This study shows there’s no difference in pain relief when compared with codeine, and when the DEA changes hydrocodone to a Schedule II drug, the supplies will dry up quickly.

Mammography may be diagnosing too many cancers. The idea is that some of the tiny cancers found on mammography would never progress or threaten a patient’s life. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment is expensive and potentially dangerous. So the question becomes: Why are radiologists overcharging patients and insurance companies for reading these unnecessary exams and why are surgeons performing these unnecessary surgeries?
Hey ACR – kind of sucks when your own dumbass logic is used against you, doesn’t it?

Catholic Health Initiatives settles lawsuits relating to unnecessary heart stenting procedures performed by Dr. Mark Midei. Total payouts will be $37 million, with each patient receiving payment of at least $134,000.

Patient with potential measles left sitting with other patients at Rhode Island Hospital. Rhode Island Department of Health descends upon hospital and demands immediate action to prevent “potential harm to the public.” Hospital now must re-educate and re-train staff regarding “care and treatment, including emergency room assignments and required precautions, for patients presenting with contagious or potentially contagious conditions.” The patient presented with “flu like symptoms with fever (which is a symptom of the flu).” Given that every snot nose is a potentially contagious condition, there are going to be a lot of cases of “potential harm to the public” regardless of what training takes place.
All because some brainiac decided not to get immunized.
And the patient didn’t even have measles. Sheesh.

California malpractice cap could be raised from $250,000 to $1.1 million during November ballot vote.
Notice now: If you practice in California, get licensed in other states and start working on hospital privileges. California has officially become runner up to Florida for states in which you don’t want to practice medicine.

Florida Supreme Court rejects medical malpractice caps.

Kansas also planning to raise the limits on non-economic damages – from $250,000 to $350,000.

Pennsylvania considering increasing the standard for malpractice in emergency settings from simple negligence to gross negligence and increasing the standard of proof to “clear and convincing” as opposed to a preponderance of the evidence.
Cue plaintiff attorney wailing and gnashing of teeth in … 3 … 2 … 1 …

You have your robot’s lawyer call my robot’s lawyer and we’ll just see about that. How do human laws apply to robots performing surgeries?

Cleveland Clinic neurosurgeon wins $7.7 million malpractice judgment against Cleveland Clinic. The neurosurgeon was using a saw during surgery when a bone chip flew into his eye. During surgery to repair the damage, the Cleveland Clinic ophthalmologist damaged the neurosurgeon’s iris, making it impossible for him to ever practice neurosurgery again.
The big question in the comments section was whether the neurosurgeon was wearing protective glasses.

California family files malpractice suit after elderly family member declared dead of heart attack, placed in morgue, but allegedly was still alive. Morticians who received her body several days later found her face down in the body bag with broken nose and disfiguring cuts and bruises to her face.
Video about the incident here.

3 Responses to “Healthcare Update Satellite 04-24-2014”

  1. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acem.12331/abstract
    In reference to the above study on lortab vs T3, please comment on the concerns with RX codeine to children. The study does not address this issue. Thanking you in advance.

  2. Matt says:

    WC,

    I swear you once said $250K was too low, now it’s the end of the world when it’s above that? A number it’s been at for decades? You’re so much smarter than that, and I also thought in another posts’s comment section recently you gave a long impassioned speech about reasonable and thoughtful discussion. Yet here you are parroting insurer talking points?

    And enough with the Florida nonsense. For as bad as you claim Florida is, the number of physicians there is actually increasing. Additionally, it’s well known, even in Florida, that caps do virtually nothing with regard to insurance rates for physicians.

    I encourage you to follow your own advice:

    “The point is that we need to avoid the rhetoric in the first place. There are going to be trolls and special interests that try to leverage your emotions for their benefit by making this claim and similar claims. Don’t let them.
    Educate yourself about the issues. Make informed decisions. Don’t vote with your emotions.”

  3. B.RAD says:

    “Why are radiologists overcharging patients and insurance companies for reading these unnecessary exams and why are surgeons performing these unnecessary surgeries?”

    Unnecessary? Says who? They’re ordered for the same reason you order “unnecessary” abdominal/pelvic CT scans on kids with the stomach flu. BTW, hospital radiologists don’t set prices for mammograms.

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