WhiteCoat

Healthcare Update Satellite — 06-17-2014

Read more healthcare-related news from around the web on my other blog at DrWhitecoat.com

Oklahoma University Medical Center joins the growing ranks of hospitals that are requiring patients to pay a fee of $200 to be treated for non-emergency complaints. That amounts to an estimated 40% of OU’s emergency department visits. If patients do not want to pay for non-emergent care, they will be referred to nearby urgent care clinics.
This “triage out” protocol will eventually become a standard throughout US emergency departments. Count on it.

Emergency physician writes about how she almost diagnosed Lou Gehrig’s Disease in the emergency department, then learned that the real diagnosis wasn’t quite so ominous.

Holy Cross Hospital puts bowl of Percocet tablets in waiting room. Wait times suddenly decrease to record lows and there hasn’t been a complaint about the ED in months.

Florida emergency physician put on probation, nearly loses license, and has to pay $5000 fine after relying on reports of physician assistant’s assessment of a patient’s finger injury rather than evaluating the patient and making the diagnosis himself. The patient returned the following day and required a finger amputation.
Keep in mind that you may not be covered by your malpractice insurance policy when an injury results from your supervision of other health professionals. Your agreement to supervise could be construed as a contractual agreement or as an administrative duty instead of the practice of medicine – for which malpractice insurance covers you.

Our overuse of antibiotics over the years has caused a crisis of antibiotic resistance. The Telegraph warns us that the golden age of medicine has come to an end.
“Antibiotics are no longer effective. The drugs that have transformed life and longevity and saved countless millions since penicillin was discovered by Sir Alexander Fleming in 1928 now saturate every corner of our environment. We stuff them into ourselves and our animals; we spray them on crops, dump them in rivers, and even – as emerged at a meeting of science ministers from the G8 last year – paint them on the hulls of boats to keep off barnacles. As a result an invisible army of super-resistant bacteria has evolved, one that is increasingly claiming lives – currently more than 25,000 a year in Europe alone.”

Is Vermont State neglecting patients in need of emergency psychiatric care? Currently, only four hospitals in the entire state are capable of providing the highest level of psychiatric care.

As we lose the battle against bacteria in one area, we may have found a weapon to help us win the war. Scientists find protein that will dissolve bacterial biofilm – a substance that some bacteria create in order to protect themselves from the effects of antibiotics. Think of it as if we found a weapon that penetrated the shields on Klingon warships.

Child rushed to emergency department after allegedly drinking nicotine from e-cigarette cartridge. The cartridges are childproof and there is nothing in the article stating that the child actually ingested the liquid, but we should probably just ban nicotine to keep our children safe.

Neat story about a Florida emergency physician and CPR instructor who passed out and died … for 20 minutes … until CPR brought him back to life. Talks about “the light” and how lucky he is to be alive.

More patients in Oregon emergency department – about 600 more per month – after Obamacare took effect.
Most of those patients were “losing access to doctors who’ve cut-back on the number of Medicaid patients because reimbursements don’t cover their costs.” For example, “the Vancouver Clinic announced recently it will no longer accept new Medicaid patients.”
Wait. People with insurance are having problems with access to care? This can’t be. They told us that emergency department visits would decrease. The title of the legislation is the Affordable CARE Act. How can this be happening?

4 Responses to “Healthcare Update Satellite — 06-17-2014”

  1. Mandy says:

    The title of the legislation is the Affordable CARE Act. How can this be happening?

    Just to rub it in a little bit more, the full title is the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA).

    Patient*
    Protection*
    and
    Affordable*
    Care*
    Act

    *your mileage on every word in that title except ‘and’ and ‘act’ may vary.

  2. Neal says:

    The bowl of Percocet article, is from GomerBlog, “strickly (sic) a satirical and fake news blog site.”

  3. Ian Random says:

    Came across an article saying that the FDA increased the proof threshold, so drug companies dropped out.

    http://junkscience.com/2014/05/12/why-no-antibiotic-development/

  4. markps2 says:

    Regarding emergency psychiatric care.

    The human brain becomes oversensitive to dopamine after long term exposure to psychiatric medicine.
    Once you start, you can’t stop, like any drug addiction.

    “Neuroleptic-induced supersensitivity psychosis” written by Chouinard G, Jones BD, Annable L. : Am J Psychiatry. 1978 Nov;135(11):1409-10

    Scanned photocopy you can read
    http://robertwhitaker.org/robertwhitaker.org/Schizophrenia_files/Chouinard%281%29.pdf

    But the question is was the brain broken before the medicine?

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